Mario Dennis Photography

The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see. G.K. Chesterton


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Photographing Nubble Light

cape-neddick-light_17736674164_oNubble Light (AKA Cape Neddick Light) is located on a small island just off York, Maine. It was second on our list of lighthouses to shoot at sunset. When we arrived it was windy and very chilly and, of course, there were a half-dozen photographers there ahead of us. There was plenty of space on the nearby rock to set up, so we tried a few spots before settling in and waiting for the sun to set. (One dedicated shooter was dressed in shorts and a t-shirt. I’m not sure how he kept from freezing.)

Once again, the other photographers packed and left shortly after sunset, and we had the place to ourselves.

Has no one heard of the Blue Hour?


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Photographing Bass Head Light

Bass Head Light, Acadia NP, MaineKathy and I took our long-planned trip to Maine in May. After a quick flight to Boston, it took the rest of the day to make the drive to Bar Harbor, including a stop at the L.L. Bean store in Freeport.

Unfortunately, the weather was overcast with a low ceiling, mist, and fog for the first two of our three nights in the area. I like pictures in foggy locations: they can be very evocative. But it was getting very tiresome.

Finally, Night #3’s weather was perfect. We arrived at Bass Head about 7:00 PM. With the late sunset of the northern latitudes we knew we were in for a long evening. There were several photographers there already, but there was plenty of room for us to find our own spots, so we planted our tripods and waited.

It being May, sunset was late (7:45), and we took a few frames now and then, adjusting our locations slightly. Finally, I captured the first of my two favorite shots as the sun dropped to the horizon. A few minutes later the other photographers packed up and left, leaving just the two of us. Apparently, they were unfamiliar with the Blue Hour, scheduled to last until 8:45. In any case, the sky turned a deep blue and a few stars appeared. I took the second photo, a 30-second exposure, at almost 9 PM. It now hangs as a beautiful canvas print on my office wall. (Thank you, Kathy.)

The lesson: sometimes it doesn’t get interesting until the other photographers leave.